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North Korea warns of 'abyss of doom' if 'old lunatic' Trump remains president




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This Day in History

"What Hath God Wrought" (1844)
Samuel F.B. Morse was originally a painter, and a good one. His portraits still rank among the finest produced in the US. However, he is best remembered for having developed the telegraph and the code of dots and dashes that bears his name. In 1844, Morse demonstrated the practicability of his instrument to Congress by transmitting the famous message "What hath God wrought" over a wire from Washington, DC, to Baltimore. Morse was also instrumental in introducing what other innovation to the US? Discuss

Pro Wrestler Owen Hart Falls to His Death in the Ring (1999)
Regardless of whether one considers professional wrestling a sport or merely choreographed entertainment, one cannot deny that wrestlers often risk serious injury in the ring. High-flying stunts and feats of flamboyant showmanship are now par for the course. Tragically, the dangerous nature of wrestling was graphically illustrated in 1999, when Hart, one of professional wrestling's most respected stars, was killed during a live event. The tragedy unfolded when what stunt went horribly wrong?

Nuclear Submarine USS Scorpion Sinks, Cause Unknown (1968)
On May 21, 1968, the crew of the US Navy's Scorpion submarine engaged in communications with land stations. Six days later, the submarine was reported overdue. After an unsuccessful search, the Scorpion and its crew were "presumed lost." However, in October, a Navy research ship located sections of the submarine's hull in approximately 10,000 feet (3,048 m) of water about 400 miles (644 km) southwest of the Azores. What are some theories about how the Scorpion may have sunk?